Truth Bowl CQ 2019-03-20 Free Speech with Consequences

Challenge Question for V2 of Truth Bowl (the ad hoc version)

You are a professor of philosophy at a large university. You’ve just received a panicky phone call from your former schoolmate Pat, the chair of humanities at a struggling liberal arts college out East. You vaguely remember hearing the school brought in an investment banker alum as president to pull off a turnaround. Pat informs you that said banker has invited a controversial book author to campus as a publicity stunt, and in one hour Pat is expected to face that author in some sort of debate.

Pat (and you) have never read the book or heard the author speak. However, many of your peers consider him a right-wing reactionary with the ear of Trump, who wants to abolish modern education and replace universities with some sort of theocratic communes. Previous invitations for him to speak at major universities have been rescinded due to outraged protests by students and faculties. That’s probably why this college president jumped at the chance to gain notoriety as the first school to host the author — and didn’t tell anyone until the last minute.

Several colleagues have urged Pat to quit and boycott the event, since it feels like a setup; better to be a martyr than risk legitimizing someone who seems both willing and able to destroy everything they stand for.

There isn’t much time. The only background material you have to go on is one relatively balanced book review.

Challenge Question: What advice would you give Pat, and why?

Options include (but are not limited to):
– Directly engaging with / critiquing (the ideas of) the author
– Proposing a debate format that would ensure Pat’s views get a fair hearing, despite the lack of preparation (Pat has enough authority to dictate the format, but not enough to escape the debate )
– Providing a clear rationale why it is Pat’s moral duty to boycott the event


Sign Up for Truth Bowl v1.0: Thu Jan 24 10:30am

This is it!  Please let me know by Monday if you can join a team for the 1.0 Truth Bowl competition:

Thursday, Jan 24th, 10:30 AM US Pacific Time
We want to put together two teams of 2-4 people each to start discussing the cases in advance.
Feel free to invite anyone else who might be interested; we will also need a few people to act as judges.  A draft Blurb is below (feedback welcome).

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8 Design Principles for Self-Governance

From Elinor Ostrom via Evonomics.

Eight core design principles:

  1. Clearly defined boundaries
  2.  Proportional equivalence between benefits and costs
  3. Collective choice arrangements
  4. Monitoring
  5. Graduated sanctions
  6. Fast and fair conflict resolution
  7. Local autonomy
  8. Appropriate relations with other tiers of rule-making authority (polycentric governance).

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A Radical Centrist Vision for the Future by Billy Rojas

RadicalCentrism.org is proud to announce a monumental new work by Billy Rojas:

A Radical Centrist Vision for the Future

100 New Constitutional Amendments for the 21st Century

This exhaustive treatise lays out a comprehensive vision of not just how to interpret the constitution, but how to update it to address governance and civic issues of critical importance to the American body politics.
You’re guaranteed to find many things you agree with, some you disagree with, and a few that will challenge you deeply.
Please read it over, then come share your thoughts with Billy (and the rest of us) on our forum.

 


Part 1 – 100 New Constitutional Amendments by Billy Rojas

A Radical Centrist Vision for the Future:

100 New Constitutional Amendments

Billy Rojas – RadicalCentrism.org – 2011

Update: The contents of this page have become part of the sub-site A Radical Centrist Vision for the Future100 New Constitutional Amendments for the 21st Century.

 

 


Steve Denning on Radical Management & Consumer Capitalism

I’ve been enjoying a series of blog posts by Steve Denning about the reinvention of modern management, not least because they mirror my own thinking about Sustainable Capitalism (2.0).  Although he focuses on corporations, I believe the same kind of outside-in, human-centric thinking is essential for revitalizing both politics and government.

While much of the information from his blog is presumably collected in his book Radical management | Reinventing the workplace for the 21st Century, there isn’t a good index of what I consider his key themes.  To that end, I’ve collected them in outline form here.

The Death—and Reinvention—of Management

Measuring Business’s New Bottom Line: Customer Delight

  1. Measuring customer delight at the organizational level
  2. Measuring customer delight at the working level
  3. Client delight: Sizing and prioritizing
  4. Measuring a key aspect of customer delight: time
  5. Tracking client delight in real time: social media

Democratic Deliberation Among Geeks

For future reference, here’s some articles about how deliberative polling may resemble open source and Web 2.0 development practices.

There’s lots of ways to do this badly, but even a single way to apply the lessons wisely could revolutionize our understanding of governance.